Acupuncture may be defined as the insertion of needles into specific points on the body to cause a desired healing effect. 

This technique is used in veterinary practice to treat functional problems such as those that involve paralysis, non-infectious inflammation (such as allergies), and pain.

Although acupuncture dates back to the years 2000BC to 3000BC in China, the major emergence of veterinary acupuncture onto the medical scene did not happen until the early 1970s. 

Veterinary acupuncture was introduced into the United States in 1971 by members of the National Acupuncture Association’s research team: Dr. Gene Bruno and Dr. John Ottaviano. They treated thousands of small animals and several hundred horses before founding the International Veterinary Acupuncture Society (IVAS).

Association of British Veterinary Acupuncturists
For more information go to: www.abva.co.uk

Recommended Reading

Veterinary Acupuncture by Alan Schoen

Covers the concepts of acupuncture and anatomic and neurophysiological and then discusses practical application such as techniques, instrumentation and point selection.

Explains differences between traditional Chinese medicine concepts and that of western orthodox medicine..

 

 

Interesting Acupuncture Therapy Sites

www.alternativevet.org The site of Chris Day MRCVS, holistic vet practising alternative therapies including acupuncture and homeopathy, based in Oxfordshire

www.equinenaturaltherapy.com Provides an interesting article on acupuncture and how it works. A therapy centre for lameness in horses based in County Down, Northern Ireland

www.holisticvet.co.uk Holisticvet is a veterinary consultancy based in Bath, North Somerset, offering homeopathy, acupuncture and nutritional advice for horses

www.equineacupuncture.co.uk Sue Devereux MRCVS, a veterinary surgeon who lives and works in the Salisbury area, where she accepts referrals for acupuncture.

www.donnablinman.co.uk Donna offers equine acupuncture to horse owners, para-professionals and vets, with a specialist service for horses suffering from back pain and under performance.

Training in Veterinary Acupuncture

This is open only to qualified veterinary surgeons. In the UK, courses are run by the Association of British Veterinary Acupuncturists. www.abva.co.uk

In the United States courses are run by: International Veterinary Acupuncture Society www.ivas.org